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Would you buy the Nissan Pathfinder Hybrid?

  • yes

    Votes: 6 37.5%
  • no

    Votes: 10 62.5%
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Finally Nissan is bringing a Hybrid version of our generation of Pathfinders to the market for 2014. It might be the answer some of you were looking for on a Pathfinder with far better gas mileage.

There's very little information on it at the moment, but anyone familiar with Hybrids should be able to speculate on the Nissan Pathfinder Hybrid specifications.

Moving onto specifications, pricing, etc... starting with price, I have reason to believe the 2014 Nissan Pathfinder Hybrid will start in the low $40 000's. Seeing how the current 2013 Nisan Pathfinder SL starts at $34 850 and adding the typical Hybrid vehicle "mark-up", low $40 000 seems to be a realistic price.

What sort of gas mileage numbers would you guys expect from it?


2014 Nissan Pathfinder Specifications:

Price: TBA
Engine: 2.5-litre petrol engine assisted by an electric motor
Drivetrain: ALL-MODE selectable AWD
MPG: City - TBA, Highway - TBA
Horsepower: TBA
Torque: TBA
 

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The hybrid will be revealed tomorrow at the New York Auto Show in the Infinit JX, the Pathfinder twin. It features a 2.5L Supercharged 4-cylinder with hybrid electric drive. Nissan claims 15% better fuel efficiency over the current model which I think is absolutely pathetic considering the huge sticker price premium you pay over the regular V6 model, not to mention the added complexity and potential reliability issues compared to a simple V6.

Don't get me wrong, I'm very much in favor of implementing whatever technologies are best to increase fuel efficiency and reduce our environmental footprint, ultimately moving us completely away from fossil fuels in the coming decades. But I am not willing to be an early adopter/guinnea pig, paying a huge price premium for small efficiency gains. For me to even consider it, it must be at least 30% more efficient than the current model.

I would much rather see Nissan make smaller, incremental gains for little or no price increase to the consumer, similar to what they've already done with the CVT - keep going with this method, same vehicle price, actually much cheaper than the outgoing model, with vastly improved efficiency due to weight reduction, smaller engine, and new CVT tranny. The next step could be similar to what Ford has done with their EcoBoost engines - offer a smaller displacement turbo with direct injection, to provide another 10% increase in effiency, and price it very close to current model. As a consumer it's all about value and bang-for-your-buck, and this is excellent value - I am not asked to pay anything extra, and I get significant efficieny gains and fuel savings. I believe this is the only way to go, Mazda has been very successful with this strategy, the "SkyActiv" approach, all geared towards making the combustion engine more efficient while we wait for a revolutionary technolgoy to come and replace the combustion.

Mazda will sell MILLIONS of these units, Nissan will only sell a handful of hybrid Pathfinders because the numbers just don't make sense, unless they surprise us and price it competitively. Extra price premium for hybrid electric can work, the Highlander Hybrid has done alright, but it has to reasonable, say $2-3000, or else people just won't adopt it in any great numbers. Toyota has gotten the hybrid prices down to where they're very close to non-hybrid prices, Nissan must do the same or go for the short term benefits of small displacement turbo's like Ford.
 

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The hybrid will be revealed tomorrow at the New York Auto Show in the Infinit JX, the Pathfinder twin. It features a 2.5L Supercharged 4-cylinder with hybrid electric drive. Nissan claims 15% better fuel efficiency over the current model which I think is absolutely pathetic considering the huge sticker price premium you pay over the regular V6 model, not to mention the added complexity and potential reliability issues compared to a simple V6.

Don't get me wrong, I'm very much in favor of implementing whatever technologies are best to increase fuel efficiency and reduce our environmental footprint, ultimately moving us completely away from fossil fuels in the coming decades. But I am not willing to be an early adopter/guinnea pig, paying a huge price premium for small efficiency gains. For me to even consider it, it must be at least 30% more efficient than the current model.

I would much rather see Nissan make smaller, incremental gains for little or no price increase to the consumer, similar to what they've already done with the CVT - keep going with this method, same vehicle price, actually much cheaper than the outgoing model, with vastly improved efficiency due to weight reduction, smaller engine, and new CVT tranny. The next step could be similar to what Ford has done with their EcoBoost engines - offer a smaller displacement turbo with direct injection, to provide another 10% increase in effiency, and price it very close to current model. As a consumer it's all about value and bang-for-your-buck, and this is excellent value - I am not asked to pay anything extra, and I get significant efficieny gains and fuel savings. I believe this is the only way to go, Mazda has been very successful with this strategy, the "SkyActiv" approach, all geared towards making the combustion engine more efficient while we wait for a revolutionary technolgoy to come and replace the combustion.

Mazda will sell MILLIONS of these units, Nissan will only sell a handful of hybrid Pathfinders because the numbers just don't make sense, unless they surprise us and price it competitively. Extra price premium for hybrid electric can work, the Highlander Hybrid has done alright, but it has to reasonable, say $2-3000, or else people just won't adopt it in any great numbers. Toyota has gotten the hybrid prices down to where they're very close to non-hybrid prices, Nissan must do the same or go for the short term benefits of small displacement turbo's like Ford.
I agree with every blessed word of this post. Well said.

Let's hope the rest of the industry learns from Mazda's lead.
 

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Details have been revealed at the New York Auto Show, and the 2014 hybrid Pathfinder has some promising atributes, top of the list for me is the fact that "it will be priced only $3000 above the FWD normal V6 Pathfinder."

Way to go Nissan, at least pricing is very reasonable and currently will vastly undercut the Highlander Hybrid. Also there is little to no space loss because the Li-ion battery pack is very compact. Efficiency gains will be 5 mpg city over the FWD regular V6 Pat, and just 1 more mpg highway but that is reasonable and on par with expectations of hybrid-electric vehicles.

http://blogs.cars.com/kickingtires/...er-hybrid-at-the-2013-new-york-auto-show.html

Consider +5 mpg city for $3000 additional cost - calculate this out over the life of a vehicle that spends most of its time in the city, also consider the reduced emissions, in particular when idling at red lights or a drive-thru (gas engine will turn off completely burning zero fuel, and at slow speeds will run on electric power alone, gas engine will be off), this could be a great package for certain people, such as parents of 2-4 kids who spend a lot of time and miles shuttling around town, and also want comfort for occaisional long highway trips.

For me, the one low-point is the new supercharged 2.5 engine, which is unproven in real applications. I own the current QR2.5 in my Rogue, it is efficient and powerful, but the trade-off is engine noise. Add a supercharger and I'm just not sure what the long-term reliability will be, however I believe superchargers historically have been proven to be much more durable than turbo chargers, which is possibly why Nissan chose the Super over the Turbo, and in which case should alleviate my concerns about durability long-term. I'm not sure if the hybrid will be available with AWD, I believe it will but the article isn't clear.

Overall I think this model might be somewhat competitive, time will tell, tuning and driving experience will play a big part.
 

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As much as I love my Path I do not think I would be willing to take a chance on both a new CVT and Hybrid model in same year unless both systems came with a really long warranty 100K miles or more. The price point does sound good but lets do a little math down the yellow brick road to see the ROI on this model for funsies! 1- First figuring 5 extra mpg on a 19.5 gallon tank equates to an extra 97.5 miles on range. 2- Assuming 80% driven in city like I do equates to 78 miles in added range over non-hybrid model. 3- Assuming a true combined 26 mpg into calculation as advertised yields savings of 3.75 gallons saved per tank refill. 4- Assuming $3.50 avg per gallon cost seen in PA for unleaded equates to just over $13 saved per tank of gas. 5- I am averaging 3 tank refills a month which would save me $39.00 per month X 12 months for yearly savings of $468.00 on roughly 12k miles driven. 6- Over five years and 60,000 miles my total gas savings adds up to $2340.

Conclusion: ROI on Hybrid over 5 years is Negative $660. I would have to own the Path Hybrid for 6.5 years to break even with a $3000 premium with less horsepower, towing capacity, and added maintenance concerns of using batteries. Yep just talked myself out of buyers remorse. Hoping by the time I am ready for my next one in five years technology, reliability, MPG, and cost makes a stronger case for hybrid. Im just not quite there with hybrid technology from any company yet as much as I love good MPG.
 

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Taking price out of the equation. What is gained or lost in terms of performance with a hybrid? Or is mpg really the only factor that is affected?
 

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I think it would have been more efficient if they added hybrid to the V6. Or put the Infiniti M35h engine in.
 

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I wouldn't buy one because I need the ability to tow up to 5000 lbs (3800 lb boat). The hybrid will only tow 3500 lbs. I just came out of an '08 Chevy Tahoe Hybrid - yeah, I know about the cost/pay-off equation, that's not why I bought it. Having said that, in 4 years and 50,000 miles it did everything Chevy advertised without a single hybrid powertrain problem. I routinely got 20 mpg in town (if I kept my foot out of it) and 22 - 23 mpg on the highway. That's with a 6.0 L V-8 (335 hp combined) and 4x4 with low range. It would tow 6500 lbs. Given the relatively low $3k premium, I would consider the Pathfinder hybrid IF it would tow 5000 lbs and only after seeing the performance specs and driving one. My hybrid Tahoe would outrun a stock Tahoe (5.3 L V-8 and no additional electric HP) all day long.
 

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Taking price out of the equation. What is gained or lost in terms of performance with a hybrid? Or is mpg really the only factor that is affected?
Until official performance numbers and user feedback come in to state otherwise I would say the following:

Gained: MPG
Loss: Towing Capacity, HP, Acceleration Performance (some hybrids do perform better as Beltonr explained in his post), Maintenance concerns (new generation hybrid teck untested), low rolling resistance tires will come at a cost of grip especially in winter.
 

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My hybrid Tahoe would outrun a stock Tahoe (5.3 L V-8 and no additional electric HP) all day long.
Isn't racing a Tahoe kinda like racing a school bus? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Isn't racing a Tahoe kinda like racing a school bus? ;)
LOL, Tahoe's these days are quite fast. Reason why police forces used them. I see a ton of them as highway patrol vehicles along with Crown Victoria's.

I think the pathfinder is more along the lines of racing a school bus ;)
 

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Looks like the 2014 hybrid pathfinder has LED tail lights. **** them.
yep, lol. they are nearly identical to the setup on my 13 sentra. At least I see from the front pics that no HID/Projectors are in there otherwise this entire forum would go ballistic! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Why wouldn't you buy a hybrid Nissan Pathfinder? It would make sense to help the fuel economy for such a big vehicle.
Thats what I thought, very little downsides to a Hybrid. Only downside to a hybrid is it's premium price but if your going to be a long term owner, the extra you paid for the hybrid tech will pay off.

short term just won't cut it.
 

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yep, lol. they are nearly identical to the setup on my 13 sentra. At least I see from the front pics that no HID/Projectors are in there otherwise this entire forum would go ballistic! :D
I'd be furious.
 

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Thats what I thought, very little downsides to a Hybrid. Only downside to a hybrid is it's premium price but if your going to be a long term owner, the extra you paid for the hybrid tech will pay off.

short term just won't cut it.
Based on the cost analysis I calculated in previous post here it would take roughly 75K miles to recoup the $3000 premium paid on the hybrid. my last 4 cars have not made it past that mileage so not worth it for me at all. Long term owners would benefit after break even but then you start getting into battery replacement and maintenance after 100k to negate any gains. Furthermore we all know that in a few years a lot of technology, options and other quirks with CVT will be fully resolved from 13 model adding to the appeal of getting rid of the car earlier rather than later. I am in for a trade in 3-4 years depending on the improvements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Based on the cost analysis I calculated in previous post here it would take roughly 75K miles to recoup the $3000 premium paid on the hybrid. my last 4 cars have not made it past that mileage so not worth it for me at all. Long term owners would benefit after break even but then you start getting into battery replacement and maintenance after 100k to negate any gains. Furthermore we all know that in a few years a lot of technology, options and other quirks with CVT will be fully resolved from 13 model adding to the appeal of getting rid of the car earlier rather than later. I am in for a trade in 3-4 years depending on the improvements.
Thats horrible, didn't do the math to see the specific's but now that you've broken it down, a hybrid isn't worth it unless you want it to do you part for the environment.

Might just be better to buy a hybrid pathfinder used,
 

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Until official performance numbers and user feedback come in to state otherwise I would say the following:

Gained: MPG
Loss: Towing Capacity, HP, Acceleration Performance (some hybrids do perform better as Beltonr explained in his post), Maintenance concerns (new generation hybrid teck untested), low rolling resistance tires will come at a cost of grip especially in winter.
And you only save 15% in fuel? Does not seem worth it at all. It would take years to recoup that 3k premium. Only time I would buy if they offer some sort of rebate or price cuts due to lack of sales some time down the line.
 
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