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The Shasta has a GVWR of 7411 lbs. which exceeds your Pathy's 6k towing capacity, so you would definitely be pushing the Pathfinder beyond it's limits towing this trailer.
@JayArras where did you find that info?
I googled and found that the smallest 2014 Shasta Oasis has a dry weight of 4,188 lbs. Couldn't find the GVWR for it. @Hoops66 , not sure is that is the one you have.
 

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@JayArras where did you find that info?
I googled and found that the smallest 2014 Shasta Oasis has a dry weight of 4,188 lbs. Couldn't find the GVWR for it. @Hoops66 , not sure is that is the one you have.
I have the Shasta Oasis 21ck. 26 ft in length and you have the dry weight correct at 4188 lbs.. I'll see if I can get the dealer to weigh it for me before I pick it up and see where that leaves me. I hate being new to things.
 

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Without jumping yet to conclusions.
A class III hitch receiver is rated for 6,000 lbs and a tongue weight of 600 lbs.
The TT has a dry weight of 4,188 lbs and hitch weight of 506 lbs.
The PF's curb weight is 4,660 lbs, GVWR is 5,985 lbs and 11,000 lbs when towing.

According to those numbers (11,000-4,660-4,188) you have 2,152 lbs left for occupants and any other cargo on the PF and the TT.

I agree that a brake controller and WDH are a must (although somewhere it says Pathfinders should not use a WDH), but I don't see why he wouldn't be able to tow this TT if he is careful with what loads he adds. Setting aside personal opinions about being "comfortable" doing it, what do you guys think?
 

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@JayArras where did you find that info?
I googled and found that the smallest 2014 Shasta Oasis has a dry weight of 4,188 lbs. Couldn't find the GVWR for it. @Hoops66 , not sure is that is the one you have.
On a typical weekend outing, the wife and I pack a couple of bags and I imagine the camper would get approx. 200-300 lbs. in other paraphernalia aside from how it sits now. I don't plan on boondocking so no water in the tank. I could also travel with no propane.
 

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2019 Nissan Pathfinder SV 4x4
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According to those numbers (11,000-4,660-4,188) you have 2,152 lbs left for occupants and any other cargo on the PF and the TT.

I agree that a brake controller and WDH are a must (although somewhere it says Pathfinders should not use a WDH), but I don't see why he wouldn't be able to tow this TT if he is careful with what loads he adds. Setting aside personal opinions about being "comfortable" doing it, what do you guys think?
Based on Nissan's numbers, it's well within the limits. They really are impressive numbers for this type of vehicle and drivetrain. I don't have direct experience towing with my PF. I can only go off of what folks have posted here and it seems like anything being towed in the shape of a travel-trailer in excess of 4000lbs is a chore for the PF to tow.
 
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Without jumping yet to conclusions.
A class III hitch receiver is rated for 6,000 lbs and a tongue weight of 600 lbs.
The TT has a dry weight of 4,188 lbs and hitch weight of 506 lbs.
The PF's curb weight is 4,660 lbs, GVWR is 5,985 lbs and 11,000 lbs when towing.

According to those numbers (11,000-4,660-4,188) you have 2,152 lbs left for occupants and any other cargo on the PF and the TT.

I agree that a brake controller and WDH are a must (although somewhere it says Pathfinders should not use a WDH), but I don't see why he wouldn't be able to tow this TT if he is careful with what loads he adds. Setting aside personal opinions about being "comfortable" doing it, what do you guys think?
Actually the Pathfinder's owner manual says you need a WDH, here it is from the owner's manual. "Weight-Distributing Hitch System – This type of system uses a “loadleveling” or “equalizing” hitch. The weight-distributing feature helps shift trailer tongue weight to all axles of the tow vehicle and all trailer tires. For Armada, Frontier, Pathfinder, Titan, and Nissan NV vehicles, a weight-distributing hitch ball mount (Class IV) is recommended if you plan to tow trailers with a maximum weight over 5,000 lbs. This ball mount includes a 2-5/16” hitch ball and is available through your NISSAN dealer. NOTE – A weight-distributing hitch system may affect the operation of trailer surge brakes. If you are considering use of a weight-distributing hitch system with a surge brake-equipped trailer, check with the surge brake, hitch, or trailer manufacturer to determine if and how this can be done. Follow the instructions provided by the equipment manufacturer for installing and using the weightdistributing hitch system".
 

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Actually the Pathfinder's owner manual says you need a WDH, here it is from the owner's manual. "Weight-Distributing Hitch System – This type of system uses a “loadleveling” or “equalizing” hitch. The weight-distributing feature helps shift trailer tongue weight to all axles of the tow vehicle and all trailer tires. For Armada, Frontier, Pathfinder, Titan, and Nissan NV vehicles, a weight-distributing hitch ball mount (Class IV) is recommended if you plan to tow trailers with a maximum weight over 5,000 lbs. This ball mount includes a 2-5/16” hitch ball and is available through your NISSAN dealer. NOTE – A weight-distributing hitch system may affect the operation of trailer surge brakes. If you are considering use of a weight-distributing hitch system with a surge brake-equipped trailer, check with the surge brake, hitch, or trailer manufacturer to determine if and how this can be done. Follow the instructions provided by the equipment manufacturer for installing and using the weightdistributing hitch system".
More than one member has come across some verbiage that states that the PF frame cannot support a WDH. Many of Nissan's towing literature is generic and many times it contradicts one another. I use a WDH.
 

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It has been posted before that


Wow, they claim a payload almost as much as the dry weight. It must have a heck of a frame.
This is a totally different video, and you can download a payload calc, that let's you see exactly what your payload calcs are, a great resource
 

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Personally I would NOT tow this TT, there is a downloadable towing chart, let me see if I can attach it, ok you can download it from this video on the bottom where there are comments. Watch the video, Marc does a great job explaining everything.
First I want to say I hate these type of arguments as there is no way to make everybody happy. I've had/seen too many of these on the camping/rv forums and two things always come clear:
  • Many people who own a truck say you should ONLY tow with a truck. No other vehicle is tow worthy (in their minds).
  • Liability. This is the key factor that drives many of the numbers posted by manufacturers and it seems that in North America, lobbyists hired by the Big Three have done a very good job manipulating these so more people buy big trucks which are more expensive and use more gas, it helps keep the economy moving. Without getting into it, the same vehicles sold in Europe have very different (higher) capacities.
Since the trailer's GVWR is 7,411, this combination exceeds the allowable combined GVWR of 11,000 lbs. So legally and liability wise it ends here. You should not.

I downloaded the excel file mentioned in the video and played with the numbers.
As said before, if you were very mindful of what you carry, you could (at your own risk).
If the trailer GVWR was around 5,500 lb and he carried a load of 800 lbs, everything would check out.

Capture2.JPG
 

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Doesn't that assume that I will be loading 3k lbs. to the trailer though?
It shows that the trailer CAN carry that much load and therefore those numbers are factored in the GVWR. Most of the time options like AC, larger fridge, TV, propane, etc are not accounted in the dry weight so they are already taking up some of that cargo capacity.
 

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GVWR is the best widely-published thumbnail estimate that you can use to compare trailers against each other and what your vehicle might be expected to pull. But consider it the MAX number. Dry weight is a meaningless number that RV manufacturers put out there to lead you to think how light their trailer is. In my opinion, they should not be allowed to advertise it, because it no longer reflects reality once they start installing appliances. The only TRUE way to determine how heavy your trailer is is to bring it to a truck scale and weigh it. That's not practical if you are in the market for a unit, but it certainly is a viable option if you already own the trailer and want to get the facts and peace of mind.
 

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GVWR is the best widely-published thumbnail estimate that you can use to compare trailers against each other and what your vehicle might be expected to pull. But consider it the MAX number. Dry weight is a meaningless number that RV manufacturers put out there to lead you to think how light their trailer is. In my opinion, they should not be allowed to advertise it, because it no longer reflects reality once they start installing appliances. The only TRUE way to determine how heavy your trailer is is to bring it to a truck scale and weigh it. That's not practical if you are in the market for a unit, but it certainly is a viable option if you already own the trailer and want to get the facts and peace of mind.
This is exactly what I plan to do. It's the only way I'll know for sure.
 

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First I want to say I hate these type of arguments as there is no way to make everybody happy. I've had/seen too many of these on the camping/rv forums and two things always come clear:
  • Many people who own a truck say you should ONLY tow with a truck. No other vehicle is tow worthy (in their minds).
  • Liability. This is the key factor that drives many of the numbers posted by manufacturers and it seems that in North America, lobbyists hired by the Big Three have done a very good job manipulating these so more people buy big trucks which are more expensive and use more gas, it helps keep the economy moving. Without getting into it, the same vehicles sold in Europe have very different (higher) capacities.
Since the trailer's GVWR is 7,411, this combination exceeds the allowable combined GVWR of 11,000 lbs. So legally and liability wise it ends here. You should not.

I downloaded the excel file mentioned in the video and played with the numbers.
As said before, if you were very mindful of what you carry, you could (at your own risk).
If the trailer GVWR was around 5,500 lb and he carried a load of 800 lbs, everything would check out.

View attachment 15307
I wasn't arguing with you, I agree with you. It is too much wight to be towed by that vehicle. Before I purchased my rv, I researched and researched, making sure I don't put my life or others' lives in danger. I was just sharing what I learned hoping to help others
 

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Without getting into it, the same vehicles sold in Europe have very different (higher) capacities.
Without digging too far into, this is mainly due to the fact that in Europe, they use almost nothing for their tongue weight. That is why tow vehicles are limited to 50mph over there. The trailer becomes unsteady above that speed without the 15% tongue weight that we have in North America. It makes it hard to compare between the two.
 

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Thank you Jay. Those have been my thoughts as well. I've read many times about keeping the tow weight at 80% of tow capacity and I think I would be there at about 4800 lbs. At least the trailer is sloped in the front and my wife and I travel fairly light.
I'm in a similar situation - a 2017 Pathfinder (with tow package). Trailer dry weight is 3867, load capacity 1045, hitch 387, GVWR 5360.
I've towed it a couple times and it was just fine, but minimal hills involved so far. I just got a WDH to deal with the squat.
I also got a Curt Echo wireless bluetooth brake controller which works like a charm. Highly recommended.
All this to say, you should be just fine. Your trailer can handle a lot more load, but that doesn't mean you have to load it to the max. Tow with your water and holding tanks empty for extra precaution.
 
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