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I was reading the post on another forum about the new 2020 Pathfinder pricing announcement. What does "when properly equipped" mean in this statement?
"Standard maximum towing capacity is a best-in-class of up to 6,000 pounds (when properly equipped) "
 

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The towing package.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Correct me if I'm wrong but the tow package on the 2017+ is basically the hitch and wiring harness. I guess if you tow 6000lbs you probably need a brake controller as well. Thank makes sense.
 

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The brake controller is only needed if the trailer has electric brakes.
 

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Most states have laws that require brakes on trailers heavier than 3,500 lbs. Electric brakes are the most commonly used with the exception of boat/watercraft trailers which use surge brakes.
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong but the tow package on the 2017+ is basically the hitch and wiring harness. I guess if you tow 6000lbs you probably need a brake controller as well. Thank makes sense.
That is correct. I added it myself as there were none in my area optioned exactly as I wanted.

Most states have laws that require brakes on trailers heavier than 3,500 lbs. Electric brakes are the most commonly used with the exception of boat/watercraft trailers which use surge brakes.
Uhaul and other rental trailers also all have surge brakes.
When I worked for an equipment rental place in HS/college, most of our trailers had surge brakes because customers could use them, and we couldn't rely on them to have a brake controller.
 

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Hey ERuby

Read the manual closely. It is purposefully misleading so they can market the "Best in Class TC capacity" statement, ONLY.. There Bragging rights and the numbers do not add up nor is there common sense to it. You are right in thinking if it seems to good to be true, IT IS NOT. You cannot pull a 5000-6000 travel trailer with a PF, safely in almost all cases! Nor will you have a "
when properly equipped" vehicle from the factory according to NISSAN HO to tow 6000LBS.

BTW, the 2017 TC is only 5000LBS. Nissan quietly published an addendum to the owners manual that states the change in TC back to 5000 and a GCVR of 10,000. This is still true even though people keep referring to the marketing info that was published previously. It is the same vehicle as the QX60. Max TC is still 5000LBS.....and that is not practicle for a travel trailer in some conditions(Like trying to bring your family in the vehcle with you....with lugage). It may be ok for short trips to a campsite, or for a nicely tucked in aerodynamic an boat!

The 2019 and the previous years owners manual states clearly
A weight-distributing hitch system (Class IV) is recommended if you plan to tow trailers with a maximum weight over 5,000 lbs.(2,268 kg).
Nissan does not sell a Class VI hitch for the pathfinder! It does for the Titan.

I called Nissan and pushed them for a legal answer to what they support. At first they kept referring to the manual, then I pushed it to legal and said their manual was publishing inconsistencies. They were just arbitrary facts that the consumer was drawing their own conclusions on. The final outcome from Nissan engineering and legal was The Pathfinder with the Uni-body frame does not support WDH's because it is not structurally capable.

It is unfortunate that people keep throwing out that TC # like it is just that easy. The problem is that the audience often is uninformed and doesn't know that there are many more factors to consider that just that TC#, like GCVR which makes the concept of towing a 6000LB trailer behind a PF almost impossible, by spec.

Consider this when you see TC .... You go to the gym and the most you can lift and carry around a track is a 150lb 3' log with a handle. They put a tag on your shirt that says LC is 150LBS. Someone shows you a 150lb 7'x10' piece of plywood on the floor and asks you to pick it up and walk to the other end of the room with it and back.. A travel trailer wind resistance matters as much as weight.

You might be able to pick it up, but it will be a struggle and unsafe! That is exactly how the spec is determined and exactly how people are applying it when they focus only on the TC of the PF. Understanding how vehicle manufactures determine TC, like the towing sled they use does not correlate to towing a travel trailer and that needs to be considered. Also part of the spec is that it is a stock vehicle with a ~170LB driver inside only. All getting down to what professional drivers already know. There is a lot more to this that ringing off any one spec.

The pathfinder is a great family vehicle. It is not a truck for towing a 21 travel trailer just because it's dry weight of 5500LB is less than the 6000LB TC. That is not how it goes....

Here is a great read, and should be the go to answer when people ask ..."So what is the real towing capacity of my pathfinder", so that it reduces disappointment and increases safety.

This link will provide you with good information to help you make the right decision on what size travel trailer would be good to pull behind your pathfinder.

The recommendation for a vehicle like the pathfinder is a travel trailer that is between 3000-3500 Dry Weight.

Quote

How much can I really tow?
Many people recommend giving yourself a buffer on the max tow weight. If your truck can tow 5,000 pounds your trailer should not exceed 4,000 pounds. This is to keep you safe in case you encounter any wind or weather that would require a little extra power.

There are also other factors besides the weight that will limit how big of trailer a car can tow. Those include the max tongue weight, how many passengers will be in the car and will there be anything in trunk or bed while you’re towing. Elevation can also be a factor.

Hope that helps,
 

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Read the manual closely....
..........It is unfortunate that people keep throwing out that TC # like it is just that easy. The problem is that the audience often is uninformed and doesn't know that there are many more factors to consider that just that TC#, like GCVR which makes the concept of towing a 6000LB trailer behind a PF almost impossible, by spec.
You are spot on with this.

Not just picking on the the Pathfinder's "6000lb rating", because ALL make/model vehicle tow capacity 'rating' is really a pie in the sky number once you factor in passengers, gear, etc.. etc.

It's almost like the TC number is just thrown out there for marketing purposes and the manufacturers protect themselves from litigation with the fine print in the OM.

I know folks do it w/out issue, but 3500lbs being dragged behind my PF on a long family trip would scare me about as much as the family.. Kind of a lot.
 

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You are spot on with this.

Not just picking on the the Pathfinder's "6000lb rating", because ALL make/model vehicle tow capacity 'rating' is really a pie in the sky number once you factor in passengers, gear, etc.. etc.

It's almost like the TC number is just thrown out there for marketing purposes and the manufacturers protect themselves from litigation with the fine print in the OM.

I know folks do it w/out issue, but 3500lbs being dragged behind my PF on a long family trip would scare me about as much as the family.. Kind of a lot.
I totally agree. No way can it tow 6000lbs. I think the 3500lbs is a very realistic number. I towed a 20' pontoon that was under 3000lbs and it was a struggle to keep it at 65mph on a level expressway. I can't imagine pulling a travel trailer with a solid wall of wind resistance that weighs over 5000lbs.
 

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That's is a very big statement and should be made known to everyone, clearly a safety concern, which should be communicated to all owners.
Wow! Scary stuff, when you think about it they should make it law to take a towing course. Even if its only a 3 day course, it might save lives by at least clearing up some ignorance and misconceptions the general public have about towing and driving RVS and open their eyes to the physics of it. Im not an expert but Ive seen some very dangerous towing practice about, and if you talk to some people who are buying their first RV THEY KNOW NOTHING about what the sticker on the RV is telling them. The first time RV buying knowledge base is usually a money hungry RV salesman that will say anything for them to buy a RV from them.
 

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What scares me is 70-80-90 year-olds driving Class A motorhomes.
 
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The recommendation for a vehicle like the pathfinder is a travel trailer that is between 3000-3500 Dry Weight.
I am with you on these numbers 100%. In the real world my PF can tow a TT with a MAXIMUM dry weight of 3000 with full cabin of passangers OR 3500lb TT dry weight with driver only...J and others here will tell me how wrong I am ;-) I feel that with about 15 camping trips over the last two years with 5 of them being over 1000mi roundtrip, I am pretty confident I know my PF pretty well now.
 

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I am with you on these numbers 100%. In the real world my PF can tow a TT with a MAXIMUM dry weight of 3000 with full cabin of passangers OR 3500lb TT dry weight with driver only...J and others here will tell me how wrong I am ;-) I feel that with about 15 camping trips over the last two years with 5 of them being over 1000mi roundtrip, I am pretty confident I know my PF pretty well now.
I completly agree. My 3500# pop up camper was to much for the Pathfinder and it was "Properly Equipped" for a 2014 model. I will not tow with it anymore, I purchased a Ram 1500 4x4 for that.
 
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We had a 2014 Pathfinder SL. l and towed a GeoPro G19FBS just fine. We have towed it to Yellowstone and down to Zions and gone up and down some go inclines with no problem. However, with that said going up those inclines was slow and steady and I kept it under 3500rpm. The tow mode does a pretty good job keeping the rpms reasonable.

Also, I would suggest whatever your tow rating consider only towing about half of that. The GeoPro was about 2800lbs and towed nicely and could go 65-70 on the flat straightaway. We just bought the new 2020 Pathfinder SL and I asked how they increased the tow capacity and the answer was " they changed the rear axle ratio" but who knows if that's really true.
 

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We had a 2014 Pathfinder SL. l and towed a GeoPro G19FBS just fine. We have towed it to Yellowstone and down to Zions and gone up and down some go inclines with no problem. However, with that said going up those inclines was slow and steady and I kept it under 3500rpm. The tow mode does a pretty good job keeping the rpms reasonable.

Also, I would suggest whatever your tow rating consider only towing about half of that. The GeoPro was about 2800lbs and towed nicely and could go 65-70 on the flat straightaway. We just bought the new 2020 Pathfinder SL and I asked how they increased the tow capacity and the answer was " they changed the rear axle ratio" but who knows if that's really true.
Cyberrick what year is your Geo Pro 19 FBS ? Did you hook up a weight distribution hitch as well ? Do you still have the GeoPro?
 

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Hey ERuby

Read the manual closely. It is purposefully misleading so they can market the "Best in Class TC capacity" statement, ONLY.. There Bragging rights and the numbers do not add up nor is there common sense to it. You are right in thinking if it seems to good to be true, IT IS NOT. You cannot pull a 5000-6000 travel trailer with a PF, safely in almost all cases! Nor will you have a "
when properly equipped" vehicle from the factory according to NISSAN HO to tow 6000LBS.

BTW, the 2017 TC is only 5000LBS. Nissan quietly published an addendum to the owners manual that states the change in TC back to 5000 and a GCVR of 10,000. This is still true even though people keep referring to the marketing info that was published previously. It is the same vehicle as the QX60. Max TC is still 5000LBS.....and that is not practicle for a travel trailer in some conditions(Like trying to bring your family in the vehcle with you....with lugage). It may be ok for short trips to a campsite, or for a nicely tucked in aerodynamic an boat!

The 2019 and the previous years owners manual states clearly
A weight-distributing hitch system (Class IV) is recommended if you plan to tow trailers with a maximum weight over 5,000 lbs.(2,268 kg).
Nissan does not sell a Class VI hitch for the pathfinder! It does for the Titan.

I called Nissan and pushed them for a legal answer to what they support. At first they kept referring to the manual, then I pushed it to legal and said their manual was publishing inconsistencies. They were just arbitrary facts that the consumer was drawing their own conclusions on. The final outcome from Nissan engineering and legal was The Pathfinder with the Uni-body frame does not support WDH's because it is not structurally capable.

It is unfortunate that people keep throwing out that TC # like it is just that easy. The problem is that the audience often is uninformed and doesn't know that there are many more factors to consider that just that TC#, like GCVR which makes the concept of towing a 6000LB trailer behind a PF almost impossible, by spec.

Consider this when you see TC .... You go to the gym and the most you can lift and carry around a track is a 150lb 3' log with a handle. They put a tag on your shirt that says LC is 150LBS. Someone shows you a 150lb 7'x10' piece of plywood on the floor and asks you to pick it up and walk to the other end of the room with it and back.. A travel trailer wind resistance matters as much as weight.

You might be able to pick it up, but it will be a struggle and unsafe! That is exactly how the spec is determined and exactly how people are applying it when they focus only on the TC of the PF. Understanding how vehicle manufactures determine TC, like the towing sled they use does not correlate to towing a travel trailer and that needs to be considered. Also part of the spec is that it is a stock vehicle with a ~170LB driver inside only. All getting down to what professional drivers already know. There is a lot more to this that ringing off any one spec.

The pathfinder is a great family vehicle. It is not a truck for towing a 21 travel trailer just because it's dry weight of 5500LB is less than the 6000LB TC. That is not how it goes....

Here is a great read, and should be the go to answer when people ask ..."So what is the real towing capacity of my pathfinder", so that it reduces disappointment and increases safety.

This link will provide you with good information to help you make the right decision on what size travel trailer would be good to pull behind your pathfinder.

The recommendation for a vehicle like the pathfinder is a travel trailer that is between 3000-3500 Dry Weight.

Quote

How much can I really tow?
Many people recommend giving yourself a buffer on the max tow weight. If your truck can tow 5,000 pounds your trailer should not exceed 4,000 pounds. This is to keep you safe in case you encounter any wind or weather that would require a little extra power.

There are also other factors besides the weight that will limit how big of trailer a car can tow. Those include the max tongue weight, how many passengers will be in the car and will there be anything in trunk or bed while you’re towing. Elevation can also be a factor.

Hope that helps,
Bill:
2017 PFs towing capacity is 6k, not 5k. There was an addendum of some sort created by Nissan. I can find it again if you're interested. I don't remember the exact differences, but frame is slightly different than previous gen, etc.

The issue was that the GCWR hadn't been changed to 11k from 10k. It was corrected as I said in some kind of addendum. 2017 4WD PF can tow 6k.

And totally agree that towing right to 6k is strectching it. People don't realize how quick lbs up, etc. Plus it's getting unsafe. Plus going uphill will become seriously difficult.

BUT, someone COULD do it. I didn't say SHOULD. I know your goal might have been to ''scare'' noobs, but please hear me out.

Point in case: we were towing our current trailer (4k wet roughly) with a 2011 Sienna from Toronto to Oregon prior to going PF 2017 SV. Yeah, with a TC of 3.5klbs, the Sienna struggled, but it was limited to the hills. It did struggle a lot in the hills. Switching to the PF (which was the reason for the PF) proved an excellent move. Overall control and confidence on the road and curves is much better. So a TC of 3.5k (Sienna 2011) vs 6k (PF 2017) made a huge difference. Bigger wheels, bigger frame, higher frame, bigger better brakes, more low end torque, etc. Everything is better for towing when TC increases, no question.

How to Measure Towing Capacity, GVWR, GCWR - Towing 101 (curtmfg.com)

Could I, tomorrow say, tow over 7k wet with a 2017+ PF? Probably. Even in big hills i would argue. But you'd surely have to stop a few times and go real slow in big grades. I am not advocating it (not at all: you'd be illegal): I'm saying that a lot is possible when done responsibly and when you know what you're doing. I am not encouraging anyone here to go over their ratings, it's illegal. That trip of ours with the Sienna to the west coast was stressful (constantly checking tranny temps in hills thru obd, and stopping many many times in big inclines was not fun (our final ascent at mount Rainier took so long, we must have stopped 4 times while climbing and wait for cooling...). But on the flat, it was totally fine. We came back and the Sienna shows no signs whatsoever.) Now with a cvt, it might be really silly to try that. Dunno. Haven't done it. Not planning on it neither.

So when you're getting to the limits of your specs, you better know what you're doing, that's what I'm saying. And be ready to invest in accessories (weight distribution hitch is a must, good trailer tires, etc).

Keeping your total wet trailer weight (when loaded) at about 80% of your towing capacity is indeed good advice. In the case of towing, less is better. Drive slow. Get good accessories. Think. Keep your distances. Don't be a public danger. Towing IS DANGEROUS BY DEFINITION. tires explode. Trailers disconnect from balls. Wheel bearings freeze. Axles and suspension break. Be careful. Be ready to spend money: towing trailers is an expensive hobby. Keep your gear in top shape. Grease your hubs every Fall.
Check my other posts for more details.
 

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We had a 2014 Pathfinder SL. l and towed a GeoPro G19FBS just fine. We have towed it to Yellowstone and down to Zions and gone up and down some go inclines with no problem. However, with that said going up those inclines was slow and steady and I kept it under 3500rpm. The tow mode does a pretty good job keeping the rpms reasonable.

Also, I would suggest whatever your tow rating consider only towing about half of that. The GeoPro was about 2800lbs and towed nicely and could go 65-70 on the flat straightaway. We just bought the new 2020 Pathfinder SL and I asked how they increased the tow capacity and the answer was " they changed the rear axle ratio" but who knows if that's really true.
Exactly: keep the revs under 3500rpm, you're fine.
2017+ TC is indeed 6k: GCWR is now 11k. Can find the data if required. New engine has better low-end torque, and body has been improved as well. I remember reading somewhere that TC is dependent on many aspects, not just engine, nor just brakes, etc. It's like a package deal, or like a chain: the lowest 'chain link' determines overall specs.
 
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