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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Nissan will be releasing a hybrid version of the Pathfinder that will have approximately 26mpg, which is up from the 22mpg of the front-wheel-drive, V6 powered Pathfinder. The hybrid will run on a 4 cylinder engine with a 15 kilowatt electric motor. That works out to 250 net horsepower, just 10hp less than the 3.5L V6. The only other difference to the car is LED tail lights, which are great for hybrids because they use far less power. The 2014 Nissan Pathfinder hybrid will cost $3,000 more than the V6 models.

Will you opt for the hybrid Pathfinder. or stick with the V6 version.
 

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Will be taking delivery of a 2014 Pathfinder Platinum in 7 days, so I guess I'm sticking with the V6 :)

I considered the hybrid, but I didn't want to take a chance on a new, unproven model. The extra $3000 was also a factor.

I sat out on the 2013 model so that they could get all of the first year issues fixed, so feel comfortable buying the 2014 V6 version.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Will be taking delivery of a 2014 Pathfinder Platinum in 7 days, so I guess I'm sticking with the V6 :)

I considered the hybrid, but I didn't want to take a chance on a new, unproven model. The extra $3000 was also a factor.

I sat out on the 2013 model so that they could get all of the first year issues fixed, so feel comfortable buying the 2014 V6 version.
Just think of the money you will save by having a hybrid instead of a gas only powered vehicle, not to mention that warm and fuzzy feeling of being nicer to the environment. Depending where you live you can get large tax break or subsidies too.
 

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In my opinion, anybody who chooses to be an early adopter of new technology has to be comfortable with risk, and ready to spend extra time at the dealership waiting for problems to be investigated and repaired, or they're simply overly optimistic.

Yes there is a chance that the new hybrid Pat will be rock solid reliable, but I think there's a better chance that it will experience new model "bugs". In addition to the bugs, I would be wary of the longer term weaknesses in the design that may not show up until well after warranty, such as on the Supercharger, the 4 cylinder engine itself due to higher stresses caused by the supercharger, and of course long term hybrid electric component issues.

I give Nissan a lot of credit for bringing this model to the market, but Nissan has never had the same undying commitment to reliability and quality like Toyota or Honda - instead they're more of the wild sibling who is willing to push the envelope and take risks. This can be a good thing, but not for first-model-year vehicles. For me to take a risk on a completely new first year model I would need more assurance of reliablity and durability.

After the hybrid has been around for a few years and I've observed how the "early adopters" have fared, I'll make an informed decision. It certainly seems to be priced right, and the only competitor is the Toyota Highlander Hybrid which is due out with a complete redesign in early 2014.

I really hope Nissan hits a home run with this model and they sell millions of them with solid quality, but I'm just not willing to gamble with money yet
 

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Just think of the money you will save by having a hybrid instead of a gas only powered vehicle, not to mention that warm and fuzzy feeling of being nicer to the environment. Depending where you live you can get large tax break or subsidies too.
Run the numbers for gas savings vs extra first cost. Unless your driving is at least 75% in town, you will not break even for the first five years. And by then you get to find out how much a replacement battery pack costs. Some hybrids are basically "totaled" on paper in that the replacement battery costs more than the car is worth when it is replaced.

Nicer to the environment? Has anybody figured out where the car manufacturers are going to bury all of these depleted batteries from hybrids, that hopefully will not leach heavy metals into the ground water........

I have had two turbocharged four cylinder vehicles (and 85 and and 89) and did not have a bit of trouble with the engine or turbo. But throw a supercharger on a four cylinder and try to mate it up with a hybrid electric motor and control system is just asking for it. Makes the transmission "judder" look like a minor annoyance. Not saying it will not work right eventually, but can't say how long it take Nissan to "eventually" work the bugs out.
 

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Will be taking delivery of a 2014 Pathfinder Platinum in 7 days, so I guess I'm sticking with the V6 :)

I considered the hybrid, but I didn't want to take a chance on a new, unproven model. The extra $3000 was also a factor.

I sat out on the 2013 model so that they could get all of the first year issues fixed, so feel comfortable buying the 2014 V6 version.
Were you offered any discounts/rebates for 14..how does the price of 14 v/s 13 in comparsion.
 

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Just think of the money you will save by having a hybrid instead of a gas only powered vehicle, not to mention that warm and fuzzy feeling of being nicer to the environment. Depending where you live you can get large tax break or subsidies too.
Also think of how much longer it will take to break even on the extra you paid to go hybrid ;)

What would be a big seller is knowing WHEN people will break even. Say if it's 5 years down the road, people buying a pathfinder new won't care that much about going hybrid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Also think of how much longer it will take to break even on the extra you paid to go hybrid ;)

What would be a big seller is knowing WHEN people will break even. Say if it's 5 years down the road, people buying a pathfinder new won't care that much about going hybrid.
Do we have any idea what the pricing would be on the pathfinder Hybrid so that we can do a little comparison/math?
 

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Nissan has stated it will be a $3000 premium over the non-hybrid version. Not sure what trim-level you add the $3000 on top of, but that this makes for easy math to determine if it is the right choice for your driving habits.
 

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Also think of how much longer it will take to break even on the extra you paid to go hybrid ;)

What would be a big seller is knowing WHEN people will break even. Say if it's 5 years down the road, people buying a pathfinder new won't care that much about going hybrid.
well exactly and considering most people lease now a days the 5 year break even limit isnt even reached, majority of buyers will actually loose money on the Pathfinder hybrid. I'm pretty sure Nissan knows this ;)
 

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well exactly and considering most people lease now a days the 5 year break even limit isnt even reached, majority of buyers will actually loose money on the Pathfinder hybrid. I'm pretty sure Nissan knows this ;)
Nissan knows, everyone does, at least everyone that knows the process enough ;)

The real deal will be when buying these used, but even then would you be saving that much in the end? Im sure there will be a bit of savings but probably not enough to make a REAL difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Nissan knows, everyone does, at least everyone that knows the process enough ;)

The real deal will be when buying these used, but even then would you be saving that much in the end? Im sure there will be a bit of savings but probably not enough to make a REAL difference.
The value of a used hybrid completely depends on how well the battery holds up. Like all rechargeable batteries, over time it will lose its ability to hold a charge. If the battery burns out really quickly and you are switched to gas, the car really isn't going to do wonders for ya.
 

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The value of a used hybrid completely depends on how well the battery holds up. Like all rechargeable batteries, over time it will lose its ability to hold a charge. If the battery burns out really quickly and you are switched to gas, the car really isn't going to do wonders for ya.
That's true, it would suck to pick up a used hybrid only to find out the batteries have reached the end of their life-span and you have to shell out thousands for a replacement.

At least money can be saved here as you'll get money back for the core, but it still doesn't change the fact that this will NOT be a cheap thing to replace.

Sadly this is just another PITA and will have you digging through the vehicle's history to make sure this was done.
 

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That's true, it would suck to pick up a used hybrid only to find out the batteries have reached the end of their life-span and you have to shell out thousands for a replacement.

At least money can be saved here as you'll get money back for the core, but it still doesn't change the fact that this will NOT be a cheap thing to replace.

Sadly this is just another PITA and will have you digging through the vehicle's history to make sure this was done.
The used angle interests me because Nissans new Direct Response Hybrid system operates a little differently than typical hybrids. The electric and the gas motors work together instead of alternating. It may save battery wear and tear or it could make it worse. Heres a video about DRH on the Q50 but the technology works the same here.

2014 The All-New Infiniti Q50 - Direct Response Hybrid - YouTube
 

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The used angle interests me because Nissans new Direct Response Hybrid system operates a little differently than typical hybrids. The electric and the gas motors work together instead of alternating. It may save battery wear and tear or it could make it worse. Heres a video about DRH on the Q50 but the technology works the same here.

2014 The All-New Infiniti Q50 - Direct Response Hybrid - YouTube
thanks for sharing that video. you're right about this either being a good or bad thing as time goes on. Seeing how it doesn't use 100% of the electrical system but used in collaboration with the gasoline engine to deliver power, it just could pro-long the battery life.

Now I think we just need to find out what sort of warranty comes with this.
 

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I'd be curious about something in the middle between the V6 and the hybrid. The Ford Explorer for example is available with a little 2.0 turbo in a very heavy 5000 lb vehicle, it makes numbers around 240 hp and torque. Probably too small displacement, although the numbers look good, I bet that thing is constantly in boost, which adds a lot of stress to the system.

If on the other hand they upped the size, to say a 2.5 4-cylinder like Nissan has, slap on a turbo or perhaps Nissan's supercharger, good for around say 250-260 hp and similar torque numbers, this gives you the opportunity to save fuel if you drive light on the throttle, and without the worries of complex electrical systems.

However, hybrid electric vehicles have really come a long way and are not new technolgoy anymore. The Toyota system has been around for over a decade, and has been rock solid reliable. I drive a 2008 Ford Escape hybrid for work, and I was sure that this would be nothing but trouble, but after 5 years of hard work this thing has not given us one bit of trouble, and it's a very smooth user friendly system - and this is a Ford from 2008!!! I'm sure Nissan can at least match this in present day! Battery life does not seem any different than when we first bought it, and this uses old lead acid batteries. The Nissan hybrid system uses Lithion Ion I believe, which is far superior to old lead batteries in terms of lifespan, durability, and performance. You can recharge these tens of thousands of times and they don't suffer degradation like old lead acid batteries do, and even the old batteries last many years. Nissan has a lot of experience with the Leaf, although the Pat will be different as its a gas and electric merged together, probably much more complicated.

But for me, I will not be an early adopter of this, I'll watch for a few years and see how it turns out. I'm hoping Nissan hits a homerun with this!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
It's good news to hear that you haven't found many/any problems with your 2008 hybrid. The batteries must wear out eventually. Most hybrids probably haven't been around long enough for us to see when this starts to happen, but that is a good thing I guess. The batteries seem to last at least 5 years. The problem is, if you are buying used then most cars would probably be around 5 years old when you get them. So hopefully the battery doesn't wear out at like 7 years, or you would only get two good years out of it.
 

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I'd be curious about something in the middle between the V6 and the hybrid. The Ford Explorer for example is available with a little 2.0 turbo in a very heavy 5000 lb vehicle, it makes numbers around 240 hp and torque. Probably too small displacement, although the numbers look good, I bet that thing is constantly in boost, which adds a lot of stress to the system.

If on the other hand they upped the size, to say a 2.5 4-cylinder like Nissan has, slap on a turbo or perhaps Nissan's supercharger, good for around say 250-260 hp and similar torque numbers, this gives you the opportunity to save fuel if you drive light on the throttle, and without the worries of complex electrical systems.

However, hybrid electric vehicles have really come a long way and are not new technolgoy anymore. The Toyota system has been around for over a decade, and has been rock solid reliable. I drive a 2008 Ford Escape hybrid for work, and I was sure that this would be nothing but trouble, but after 5 years of hard work this thing has not given us one bit of trouble, and it's a very smooth user friendly system - and this is a Ford from 2008!!! I'm sure Nissan can at least match this in present day! Battery life does not seem any different than when we first bought it, and this uses old lead acid batteries. The Nissan hybrid system uses Lithion Ion I believe, which is far superior to old lead batteries in terms of lifespan, durability, and performance. You can recharge these tens of thousands of times and they don't suffer degradation like old lead acid batteries do, and even the old batteries last many years. Nissan has a lot of experience with the Leaf, although the Pat will be different as its a gas and electric merged together, probably much more complicated.

But for me, I will not be an early adopter of this, I'll watch for a few years and see how it turns out. I'm hoping Nissan hits a homerun with this!
the lead acid batteries are also really really heavy
 

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Some companies are giving out life time warranties on hybrid batteries to the first owner of the vehicle. This either means that the batteries are so good that the company thinks they will last for life, or the company doesn't anticipate many buyers to keep the car long enough to see the battery wear out.
 

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Some companies are giving out life time warranties on hybrid batteries to the first owner of the vehicle. This either means that the batteries are so good that the company thinks they will last for life, or the company doesn't anticipate many buyers to keep the car long enough to see the battery wear out.
it's just a tactic to generate sales IMO.
i could never keep the same vehicle for more than 3-5 years, thats if it's one like the pathfinder. But if it was a sports car i really liked then keeping it for 5+ years is what i'd consider.
 
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