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Discussion Starter #1
I have seen several ads online listing 2013 and 2014 Pathfinders for sale with full-size spare tires. My SL Hybrid came with the temporary spare and I would like to replace it with a full-size spare before we take any long trips, but I have been unable to locate a part number or any real details on this mysterious "full-size" spare option. I have read through other threads on this forum that the 18" stock wheel's center hole is too small to accommodate the spare tire cable bracket, so just simply purchasing another matching wheel/tire combo doesn't seem to be an option either. Just curious what others may have done to remedy this situation. Thanks.
 

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In 11 years of ownership of my previous Chevy Trailblazer, I never had to use the limited service spare once. On relection, I can't remember the last time I had a flat tire. I think it was on my Mazda 626 back in 1993.

My point is that tires are made much better these days and flats are rare. That's not to say that you can't still get them, but I think swapping out a donut for a full spare is a needless worry and expense for the slim chance that you may get a flat. That's just my 2 cents after 46 years of driving.
 

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Funny you should mention this as I just had a flat. Fortunately, the Pathfinder isn't nearly as spooky to drive on a donut as the Pilot was.

To my knowledge, Nissan doesn't offer a full size spare option for the 2013+ models, which vary significantly from their truck-based predecessors.

If you want a full-sized spare, you'll need to source a steel wheel that can house the same size tire as your normal tires. I've been looking for something like this myself, since I had to replace two tires as a result of that flat (the punctured one was beyond saving and I wanted to keep the rear two tires uniform). I have the old, good tire in my garage... now as I need is a steelie with a big enough hole in the center that the lift cable can squeeze through (the factory wheels don't have a large enough hole in the center).

One thing to note though - since you have a hybrid, you're probably concerned about gas mileage. One of the big reasons that companies like Nissan use these donuts is to save weight. If you add a full sized spare that you're carrying around back there all the time, you will lose a bit of efficiency.
 

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Sure! Call me a liar, Chris lol! :laugh:
You're right though, tires are built a lot better now and the frequency of flats has greatly decreased. I suspect that at some point in the next 10 years, carbon fiber manufacturing will get much cheaper and they'll line the insides of most decent tire brands with it. They already do this on bicycle tires (my new Raleigh trail bike has this, as a matter of fact).
 

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Now a days you can get roadside assistance either very cheap (car insurance) or for free (dealerships/ credit card company) changing your own flat tire is so 1990's lol
 

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Now a days you can get roadside assistance either very cheap (car insurance) or for free (dealerships/ credit card company) changing your own flat tire is so 1990's lol
Honestly, if I have to call someone to change my own tire, I'll have my guy card revoked.
 

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Honestly, if I have to call someone to change my own tire, I'll have my guy card revoked.
then that means I had my card pulled years ago! Lol usually your guy card is handed to your wife right after the ceremony lmao!!>:D
 

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then that means I had my card pulled years ago! Lol usually your guy card is handed to your wife right after the ceremony lmao!!>:D
LOL, good one! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
@cwa107 and @JayArras, thank you both for your feedback.
@JayArras, I'm impressed that you have had as few flat tires as you've had in your driving career. I live and work right off of I-35 in Texas which is under perpetual construction (it's about a 17-20 mile commute one-way). Currently they are expanding the number of lanes which has been going on for about 3 years and is supposed to continue for another 2-3 years more (my money is on more). My neighborhood is also relatively new so new homes are being built around us constantly. In the past 7 years I have had 6 flats (on 2 different cars) one resulting in a broken rim. Most of these have been caused by nails, screws, bolts, and scrap metal from all of the construction. And this same story is told up and down the halls of my office. Sorry for all of the needless explanation, point is, flats seem to be a little more common in my own experience.

Having said that I have also considered the potential loss in mpg due to added weight and that does give me pause (i've been trying to compare aluminum rims weights to the steal temp wheel, but can't find much on that either). I have considered having the full spare for long trips only and keeping the temp for my daily commuting, but this a potentially expensive contingency for such rare occurrences. We have a young family (2 boys under 4 years old) so we don't take make too many long trips, but when we do we drive (flying is too expensive) which will include a 3,400+ mile round trip to California.

Ultimately, I'm leaning towards just taking my chances with the supplied temp spare, but I wanted to start the conversation to get others' opinions. Again thank you for your feedback and input.
 

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J-dot, if I happen to source a reasonably priced rim that fits the bill, I'll be sure to let you know.
 

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I've been driving 38 years and I never had a flat on all my vehicles. I think I have been pretty **** lucky.
I have however had Nails in my tires and had to fix them but they didn't go flat on my again lucky.
I also agree your wasting you time trying to put together a full size spare when the Factory one will get you out of a tuff spot.
Unless you want to carry 2 I suggest putting a can of fix a flat for if the rare care you blow 2 tires.
 

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I've been driving 38 years and I never had a flat on all my vehicles. I think I have been pretty **** lucky.
I have however had Nails in my tires and had to fix them but they didn't go flat on my again lucky.
I also agree your wasting you time trying to put together a full size spare when the Factory one will get you out of a tuff spot.
Unless you want to carry 2 I suggest putting a can of fix a flat for if the rare care you blow 2 tires.
A few things you need to be aware of. Firstly, Fix-A-Flat is for very specific situations. It will not fix a blow-out, sidewall damage, or even a significantly sized hole. In short, it's great when it works, but you can't rely on it for every situation.

Another thing to think about is that the Pathfinder is designed to tow and the tires have an unusual load rating (I believe it's 106T, whereas normal is 104T). So, if you happen to be towing something and get a flat, the donut spare is not even an option.

Additionally, the donut spare is only recommended for 50MPH top speed. So, if you happen to be on a 65MPH+ highway, you are endangering your family with traffic trying to whiz around you at 75MPH+.

Finally, if you happen to have a blow-out in a remote area, you'd better hope you can find a tire shop that can help you in the near vicinity as the donut spares are usually not meant to go more than 100 miles or so.

All of these are perfectly legit reasons to seek a full-size spare - they're also the reasons that until recent years, most vehicles classified as an "SUV" sell with a full-size spare from the factory.

This is not at all a trivial concern.
 

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A few things you need to be aware of. Firstly, Fix-A-Flat is for very specific situations. It will not fix a blow-out, sidewall damage, or even a significantly sized hole. In short, it's great when it works, but you can't rely on it for every situation.

Another thing to think about is that the Pathfinder is designed to tow and the tires have an unusual load rating (I believe it's 106T, whereas normal is 104T). So, if you happen to be towing something and get a flat, the donut spare is not even an option.

Additionally, the donut spare is only recommended for 50MPH top speed. So, if you happen to be on a 65MPH+ highway, you are endangering your family with traffic trying to whiz around you at 75MPH+.

Finally, if you happen to have a blow-out in a remote area, you'd better hope you can find a tire shop that can help you in the near vicinity as the donut spares are usually not meant to go more than 100 miles or so.

All of these are perfectly legit reasons to seek a full-size spare - they're also the reasons that until recent years, most vehicles classified as an "SUV" sell with a full-size spare from the factory.

This is not at all a trivial concern.
All your points are very valid. Again maybe Nissan really missed the ball with this new model so focused on getting better gas mileage , less weight and really did a bad job overall.
The tow thing I didn't even think of but now that you brought it up it makes perfect sense to have a full size spare in that situation.
I'm sure picking up another rim and tire from Nissan would be ideal. Same brand tire as whatever is on said vehicle as well as a factory full rim. I do like that idea over the temp spare.
If you are however pulling a trailer you could pick up 2 spares and keep them in the trailer for these trips.
Where would a full size spare go elsewhere? Would one fit ? Is it hanging underneath the back ?
Now I'm curious.
 

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Where would a full size spare go elsewhere? Would one fit ? Is it hanging underneath the back ?
Now I'm curious.
I think you're asking where would you stow a full-size spare? If that's the case, I would personally try to put it in the same area that the donut lives in today. The diameter of the donut matches that of the standard tires, unless I'm mistaken. So, you would have a wider tire, but the space should accommodate a full size spare. The big difference is that you'd probably be able to see it below the lower valance.

At least that's my hope... I had two Honda Pilots (a 2005 and a 2010) and each of them came from the factory with donut spares. Both were able to accommodate a full-size spare, but on the 2010, you had to remove a spacer. This was actually covered in the Owner's Manual and recommended by Honda if you were towing. I was honestly shocked to see that Nissan didn't offer similar measures.
 
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