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Should I follow 5000 mile break in?

I've done a bit of reading on break in and I am starting to think that I should just take it easy for the first 100 miles and drive like a normally do after that. Some people say to go down a hill in gear to properly seat the seals on the pistons but with CVT how is that going to work.

I didn't break in my last pathfinder and it doesn't have any problems.

Not sure if these new V6s are any different.
 

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I took this from the owner's manual from the 2013 pathfinder.

"During the first 1,200 miles (2,000 km),
follow these recommendations to obtain
maximum engine performance and ensure
the future reliability and economy of
your new vehicle. Failure to follow these
recommendations may result in shortened
engine life and reduced engine
performance.
● Avoid driving for long periods at constant
speed, either fast or slow, and do not run the
engine over 4,000 rpm.
● Do not accelerate at full throttle in any gear.
● Avoid quick starts.
● Avoid hard braking as much as possible.
● Do not tow a trailer for the first 500 miles
(800 km). Your engine, axle or other parts
could be damaged."

Basically, it's shortened to a 1200 mile break in schedule but even then, not completely necessary.

Unless you drive your car like you stole it or you granny it on the highway, you'll be fine.
 

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I took this from the owner's manual from the 2013 pathfinder.

"During the first 1,200 miles (2,000 km),
follow these recommendations to obtain
maximum engine performance and ensure
the future reliability and economy of
your new vehicle. Failure to follow these
recommendations may result in shortened
engine life and reduced engine
performance.
● Avoid driving for long periods at constant
speed, either fast or slow, and do not run the
engine over 4,000 rpm.
● Do not accelerate at full throttle in any gear.
● Avoid quick starts.
● Avoid hard braking as much as possible.
● Do not tow a trailer for the first 500 miles
(800 km). Your engine, axle or other parts
could be damaged."

Basically, it's shortened to a 1200 mile break in schedule but even then, not completely necessary.

Unless you drive your car like you stole it or you granny it on the highway, you'll be fine.
Very true, as long as you stay within the posted speed limit and aren't racing up to the posted speed limit, rather gradually reaching it, you'll be fine.

I think the most important thing is to NOT tow a trailer or anything similar in weight until your past the 500 mile mark.
 

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Hi all I am Joe and I just bought a new Pathfinder on the 2/22/2013 and now have 300 miles on it. I need to take it on a trip of 1200 miles on 3/3/13 and will not have time to put 1200 miles on it before then.

Will it hurt to drive it 300 to 400 miles at 70 - 80 miles a hour for 8 or 10 hours damage the engine? I will be stoping for fuel, food and rest area breaks as needed so it will get a rest and time to cool every hour or two.


Will this kind of driving damage the new engine? Will driving it 70-80 mph for 1 or 2 hours without a break damage the engine?

Thanks,

Joe
 

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Hi all I am Joe and I just bought a new Pathfinder on the 2/22/2013 and now have 300 miles on it. I need to take it on a trip of 1200 miles on 3/3/13 and will not have time to put 1200 miles on it before then.

Will it hurt to drive it 300 to 400 miles at 70 - 80 miles a hour for 8 or 10 hours damage the engine? I will be stoping for fuel, food and rest area breaks as needed so it will get a rest and time to cool every hour or two.


Will this kind of driving damage the new engine? Will driving it 70-80 mph for 1 or 2 hours without a break damage the engine?

Thanks,

Joe
I understand your concern, but I wouldn't worry about it. How is your drive any different than driving to work or the grocery store? The only difference is you will be doing all your break in mileage at once.

I don't think there is any reason for concern- I would tell you to drive carefully and enjoy your trip!
 

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Just concerned about driving 70-80 mph for sustained period, say 2-3 hours at a time without varying speed that much. I have always heard to vary speed while running a engine during break-in period and don't drive at a sustained speed or rpm for long periods.


So what is a sustained speed/rpm and what constitutes a sustained period of time?


Thanks I hope this isn't too redundant.

Joe
 

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Did some reading and most suggest that the break in period is 1000-2000 miles. And also, you should get an oil change between 200-1000 miles and never wait for the 3500 or 5000 mark. I read that there are lots of metal deposits which are generated within that period and changing the oil early will help things.

For $50 bucks, I think its worth it. :cool:
 

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cleandog and others: the engines are ALL run-in at the factory following assembly, on the dino. Basically they rev the **** outta it for several up-down cycles - the idea is to get the revs really high, then go completely off the throttle which creates the force necessary to seat the piston rings.

After buyers take possesion of the vehicle, most of the break-in process has already occurred and the 1200 mile break-in period is precautionary and just puts the finishing touches on the process.

However, cleandog to error on the side of caution with your very expensive new vehicle, I would adhere closely to the recommendation in your owners manual and as posted above.

DO NOT drive for extend periods of time at one rpm/speed on the highway - this is very clear and I would not recommend ignorning this warning - why take the risk? No, it won't cause your car to have a catastrophic failure, but if your vehicle is not broken in properly in its early life, it can lead to slightly lower efficiency, power, oil consumpiton and longevity, most of which won't be noticed for many years but nonetheless it could make a difference.

Have you ever wondered why there is a lot of variation in the fuel economy people report, even though they all drive the exact same vehicle? The same goes for performance, oil consumption, and longevity ex. one guys says "my Pathfinder ran for 300,000 miles", and the next guy says "my Pathfinder died at 150,000 miles of engine failure". What's the difference, same vehicle, should get similar results, but that's not the case! The big difference is how the vehicle was cared for in terms of driving habits, and maintenance.

Driving habits start the day your purchase your new vehicle, and include how it is driven when within the break-in period. Yes it may be Nissan being cautious, but rightfully so. Would you want to be wreckless with your new vehicle? No, then closely follow the break-in recommendations.

In the example of highway driving, DO NOT use cruise control, and don't hold a constant rpm for more than say 10 minutes at a time. Every 10 minutes just step down on the throttle a little bit, bring the rpms up to say 3-4000, then completely let up on the throttle and coast for a few seconds back down to cruising speed. Its the hard throttle followed by no throttle/coasting that will help seat those piston rings. And DO NOT floor it to pass, higher rpms are ok, but beyond 4000 with flat out full throttle you can do damage - the engine and trans are very tight still and aren't ready for full throttle pressures.

Just follow the break-in procedures to the letter and you'll be fine for the long term!!
 

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In the example of highway driving, DO NOT use cruise control, and don't hold a constant rpm for more than say 10 minutes at a time. Every 10 minutes just step down on the throttle a little bit, bring the rpms up to say 3-4000, then completely let up on the throttle and coast for a few seconds back down to cruising speed. Its the hard throttle followed by no throttle/coasting that will help seat those piston rings. And DO NOT floor it to pass, higher rpms are ok, but beyond 4000 with flat out full throttle you can do damage - the engine and trans are very tight still and aren't ready for full throttle pressures.
I see a lot of people driving like this on the highway. Its acceptable if you are breaking in an engine/car, but i see all sorts of car / drivers drive in this erratic manner..

Just when you want to past them on the left, they speed up like they wont let you get in front of them; once you get in back of them they slow down.. :mad:

I guess thats what they sell intelligent cruise control!
 

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I agree, its definitely not the way to drive unless you're breaking in a new car! Also around town people drive like this - hard on the gas, hard on the brake, and the cycle just continues to the point where they get very poor gas mileage, excessive brake wear and overall more wear on the vehicle not to mention it's less safe and frustrating for those around them!
 
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