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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2019 pathfinder growls between 1,000 and 1,500 rpm and it also feels as if something is holding it back. Like maybe the side brake is slightly engaged, however no red indication on the dashboard. No error codes as well and I put the car on the jack and all the tyres are freely rotating. It's really annoying. Could anybody please help me?
I just bought the car last week and it's not a certified one.
 

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One of the things on this vehicle is that OverDrive is on all the time by default unless the button on the left side of the shift knob is depressed. This will lite the "OD off" lite on the dash
I find that the vehicle really lugs (feels unresponsive) at slow speed below 1500 rpm and I always turn OD off at slow speeds
Try this to see if it helps
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
One of the things on this vehicle is that OverDrive is on all the time by default unless the button on the left side of the shift knob is depressed. This will lite the "OD off" lite on the dash
I find that the vehicle really lugs (feels unresponsive) at slow speed below 1500 rpm and I always turn OD off at slow speeds
Try this to see if it helps
Thank you for your response.

I only have sport mode button on the left side of the shift knob and by default it is off. The dash has got no red signals. The vehicle has run only 28k Kms, at least that is what the odometer shows.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
page 5-20 of the USA 2019 Pathfinder Owners manual shows the button that I am referring to.


Are you saying that you do not have this ?
I assume that the versions sent out around the world are the same. I guess, it's not true.
As I mentioned before, I do have this button but it activates sport mode which is off by default.

Please let me know if you have any other solution. I bought this used and I do not have the service history of the car. Even the agency does not have it's service history. The cars runs absolutely fine otherwise.
 

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2015 Pathfinder SL - Tech 4WD
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In some countries the OD button is labelled as Sport mode.

Some of us (me included) have felt what can be described as a "rumble" when cruising at low speeds and low rpms. It goes away by pressing the OD (sport) button.
 

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thanks jman
Safdar, you are basically saying what the manual says
The SPORT Mode is "off" by default. The Overdrive is "ON" by default
Turn "On" Sport Mode, Turns "off" OverDrive, your rpm's will increase,
the rumble dis-appears.Do this for typically under 50 kph
This is a common trait for this vehicle and most of us have got into the habit
of turning "ON" Sport mode below 50 kph. I do this all the time to improve responsiveness at low speeds
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
thanks jman
Safdar, you are basically saying what the manual says
The SPORT Mode is "off" by default. The Overdrive is "ON" by default
Turn "On" Sport Mode, Turns "off" OverDrive, your rpm's will increase,
the rumble dis-appears.Do this for typically under 50 kph
This is a common trait for this vehicle and most of us have got into the habit
of turning "ON" Sport mode below 50 kph. I do this all the time to improve responsiveness at low speeds
Understood. Much appreciate your response. However, I want to understand the root cause of the issue. What is it that is making the sound? It feels like I'm carrying a load.
 

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i suspect that the CVT transmission is slipping a little
Just my guess.
The software is telling the CVT to stay in 4th gear when it really should be in 2nd gear.

Hopefully others more knowledgeable will chime in
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
i suspect that the CVT transmission is slipping a little
Just my guess.
The software is telling the CVT to stay in 4th gear when it really should be in 2nd gear.

Hopefully others more knowledgeable will chime in
I understand the CVT issue was fixed starting 2018 models.

Does anyone think it is a CVT issue? The car feels as if carrying a load and the RPM is not stable too. Even if I press the gas gradually still the rpm goes around 2k, as if I'm carrying a heavy load. Once the car reaches about 80kmph it's smooth.
 

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I understand the CVT issue was fixed starting 2018 models.

Does anyone think it is a CVT issue? The car feels as if carrying a load and the RPM is not stable too. Even if I press the gas gradually still the rpm goes around 2k, as if I'm carrying a heavy load. Once the car reaches about 80kmph it's smooth.
I can only offer my experience, one with a JATCO CVT in a Jeep and one with my 2017 Pathfinder. The Jeep was a 2010 I think.

Both droned in and around 1,000 rpm as described in this thread. In both cases my mechanic (independent shop, Nissan factory trained) suggested a drain and fill (not a flush and fill). In both cases my symptoms went away.
 

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Care to explain the difference between a "drain and fill" and a "flush and fill"?
Well I'm not a subject matter expert but as my very competent mechanic explained to me a drain and fill only gets 4-5 litres of fluid out and the same amount back in just infuses the CVT with a "shot" of fresh fluid. A flush and fill involves getting the transmission up to a certain temperature so some whatever internal opens up and you get twice or more the amount draining out. Appaently you then use the CVT itself as a pump to expel fluid...Then the refill process gets involved with the fill dipstick needing a temperature readout, things to do with overflow drains as well as drain drains, buncha stuff.

Advice given to me by both my current mechanic and by the Jeep guys back in the day was that fairly frequent drain and fills were the ticket. They both think every 40 to 50,000 km time frames are good. That is 30 to 50,000 miles ruffly.
 

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IIRC this transmission takes 5.9 liters. No matter how you do it, you always get about 3-4 liters out of it. The rest remains mostly in the torque converter and there is no way to take it out without removing it.
The difference resides on how many "drain and refill" events you are doing. If its just one then it would make sense to call it "drain", if you are doing two to more then I'd call it a "flush".
When flushing, you want to let the fresh added oil warm up and circulate, shift between PRNDL. Then drain and refill.
The filling process is though the dip stick tube unless you have the tools to fill it from the overflow plug. To reach the right level you will wait for the transmission to reach the right temperature and rain the excess through the overflow port.
I did the math some time ago when a shop added the wrong oil to my transmission (and I went there for a transfer oil change !).
With just one drain and refill you end with 66% new oil, 77% with two, and so on. I did eight back then.

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
IIRC this transmission takes 5.9 liters. No matter how you do it, you always get about 3-4 liters out of it. The rest remains mostly in the torque converter and there is no way to take it out without removing it.
The difference resides on how many "drain and refill" events you are doing. If its just one then it would make sense to call it "drain", if you are doing two to more then I'd call it a "flush".
When flushing, you want to let the fresh added oil warm up and circulate, shift between PRNDL. Then drain and refill.
The filling process is though the dip stick tube unless you have the tools to fill it from the overflow plug. To reach the right level you will wait for the transmission to reach the right temperature and rain the excess through the overflow port.
I did the math some time ago when a shop added the wrong oil to my transmission (and I went there for a transfer oil change !).
With just one drain and refill you end with 66% new oil, 77% with two, and so on. I did eight back then.

View attachment 17921
Anybody thinks the growling sound could be as a result of bad drive tensioner for the drive belt?
 

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I have a 2018 pathfinder with the exact same thing. 3 diferent mechanics told me it's normal on CVT transmission and I doest that in a way to save gas. Because it doesn't have eco mode. So that's it. It's normal it's not going to harm your car at all. Just learn how to leave with that like if u were driving a manual transmission car. Just learn how to press the gas pedal to avoid that.. Hope you find this helpful. spent spen
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have a 2018 pathfinder with the exact same thing. 3 diferent mechanics told me it's normal on CVT transmission and I doest that in a way to save gas. Because it doesn't have eco mode. So that's it. It's normal it's not going to harm your car at all. Just learn how to leave with that like if u were driving a manual transmission car. Just learn how to press the gas pedal to avoid that.. Hope you find this helpful. spent spen
The noise is still fine however the car feels as if carrying a load. Even if I'm at high speed and if the motion breaks the pick up feels too heavy. Do you have the exact same possible? Because I feel this is putting more pressure on the engine and maybe on the CVT as well and will deteriorate them faster than normal.
 

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This is what mechanics told me too.

It is well-known that, compared with automatic transmissions (ATs), continuously variable transmission (CVT) shows advantages in fuel saving due to its continuous shift manner, since this feature enables the engine to operate in the efficiency-optimized region.
 
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