Nissan Pathfinder Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Nissan is releasing a hybrid version of the 2014 Pathfinder and now we know how much it is going to cost us. The entry level Pathfinder Hybrid SV 2WD will go for $35,110. That is $3,000 more than the similarly equipped gas-only version of the SUV. The AED version of the Pathfinder Hybrid SV bumps the price up to $36,710.

There are also trim levels for the Pathfinder Hybrid. The SL will go for $38,050 FWD, and $39,650 AWD. The Platinum goes for $42,750 FWD, and $44,350 AWD.

None of the prices include the mandatory $860 destination charge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Is the extra $3000 for the hybrid worth it when you consider the better fuel efficiency? How long will it take you to make your money back in fuel savings?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, the Pathfinder Hybrid gets 25 miles per gallon in the city and 28 mpg on the highway. This is a bump of 5 mpg and 2 mpg respectively from the petrol version of the Pathfinder. So you'd have to figure out what the average price of gas is and how much you drive. And then you could figure out how long it would take you to save the extra money that you spent on the hybrid.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
Well, the Pathfinder Hybrid gets 25 miles per gallon in the city and 28 mpg on the highway. This is a bump of 5 mpg and 2 mpg respectively from the petrol version of the Pathfinder. So you'd have to figure out what the average price of gas is and how much you drive. And then you could figure out how long it would take you to save the extra money that you spent on the hybrid.
Hopefully there will be some independent real-world testing once it is released. I know I am averaging 17.4 mpg, primarily city driving in heavy traffic.

Since I am getting 3 mpg below the city projection with the conventional engine, I would love to see if the real-world city fuel economy difference is more or less than 5 mpg. I tend to think that real-world might be closer to projected with the hybrid, since idling, accelerating, then immediately braking might not even engage the gas-powered motor.

I am paying an average of $2.92 per gallon, which translates into 16.8 cents per mile. If the hybrid lived up to its city mpg claim, it would cost me roughly 11.7 cents per mile, a savings of 5.1 cents per mile. I drive roughly 250 miles per week (not counting weekends), so that would be a fuel savings of $12.75 per week. That's around $53 per month saved on fuel.

My monthly car payment would be roughly $48 higher with the added cost, so I would barely break even on monthly cost of ownership. So it would really hinge on what gas prices do and how well the hybrid holds its value relative to the conventional version.

Ultimately, a potential to save an insignificant amount of money over the life of the car, and a lot more risk of not recouping the premium paid for the hybrid. Not a great deal from a financial perspective unless you get some extrinsic benefit from owning a hybrid vehicle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,259 Posts
Is the extra $3000 for the hybrid worth it when you consider the better fuel efficiency? How long will it take you to make your money back in fuel savings?
When you buy a hybrid you're also supporting the industries move to push hybrids even harder and to make them even more affordable.

Buy it for more than just fuel efficiency.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
When you buy a hybrid you're also supporting the industries move to push hybrids even harder and to make them even more affordable.

Buy it for more than just fuel efficiency.
The problem is that most Hybrid cars are not really hybrid. They are just more efficient - i.e. able to save some of the kinetic energy lost under braking back into some kind of energy store.

A true 'hybrid' is one that can be 'fuelled' by electricity - or what is called a plug-in hybrid such as the Chevy Volt.

A lot of new cars include the brake energy regeneration but don't get the hybrid moniker - those are cars such as many BMW models, the new Mazda 6, and probably others.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
When you buy a hybrid you're also supporting the industries move to push hybrids even harder and to make them even more affordable.

Buy it for more than just fuel efficiency.
That would be a collective action issue. People need to buy hybrids to get them to be more affordable, but people only want to buy them once they become more affordable. The average person would want others to buy the more expensive hybrids first and then they cash in on the more affordable one.

It is this phenomena that leads the government to offer subsidies for hybrids and electric vehicles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Hopefully there will be some independent real-world testing once it is released. I know I am averaging 17.4 mpg, primarily city driving in heavy traffic.

Since I am getting 3 mpg below the city projection with the conventional engine, I would love to see if the real-world city fuel economy difference is more or less than 5 mpg. I tend to think that real-world might be closer to projected with the hybrid, since idling, accelerating, then immediately braking might not even engage the gas-powered motor.

I am paying an average of $2.92 per gallon, which translates into 16.8 cents per mile. If the hybrid lived up to its city mpg claim, it would cost me roughly 11.7 cents per mile, a savings of 5.1 cents per mile. I drive roughly 250 miles per week (not counting weekends), so that would be a fuel savings of $12.75 per week. That's around $53 per month saved on fuel.

My monthly car payment would be roughly $48 higher with the added cost, so I would barely break even on monthly cost of ownership. So it would really hinge on what gas prices do and how well the hybrid holds its value relative to the conventional version.

Ultimately, a potential to save an insignificant amount of money over the life of the car, and a lot more risk of not recouping the premium paid for the hybrid. Not a great deal from a financial perspective unless you get some extrinsic benefit from owning a hybrid vehicle.
I think that you also have to consider that gas prices will likely rise over time. It seems that fuel only keeps getting more and more expensive.

From what you laid out here it seems that a Hybrid would barely be a good investment. It depends on things like how often you drive, where you live (which affects gas prices,) and how much you value the environment.

Can you get any money from the government for buying a hybrid?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,259 Posts
I think that you also have to consider that gas prices will likely rise over time. It seems that fuel only keeps getting more and more expensive.

From what you laid out here it seems that a Hybrid would barely be a good investment. It depends on things like how often you drive, where you live (which affects gas prices,) and how much you value the environment.

Can you get any money from the government for buying a hybrid?
Another thing making petrol engines, even the V6's and V8's still justifiable to have is cylinder deactivation. Now some V8's can get up to 28MPG's on the highway. That's just in a sports car. In an SUV it would be a few points less.

Combine that V8 with hybrid tech and you can get even more range. So although gas prices might be higher it might not be a bigger issue later on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
What is this cylinder deactivation you speak of? Does that mean that a 8-cylinder can turn into a 6 cylinder in order to save fuel?
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top